Friday, September 22, 2006

 

How Do You Paint These, Anyway?

Several other gamers have asked me how I go about painting these very small figures and I thought I might do a work-in-progess report on a unit or two to illustrate how I go about converting shiny metal figures into finished painted gaming pieces.

I'll spend some time discussing techniques and tools but mostly I'll let the pictures do the talking. I won't record every little detail of the process ("Here's picture #110 where I painted the cravats on Lord Fumblefutz's Regt. of Foot.") as that would bore my readers and myself to tears, but I will cover the major steps (if I don't forget to take the pic before moving on to something else, that is!)

I'm also going to try to keep track of the amount of time it takes to complete a unit as I've been asked about that, too. If I end up forgetting to make an accurate record of the time spent, I hope I will be forgiven as I've never tried to integrate my painting with blogging and it'll take some time to work out the breaks between painting, picture taking and writing/posting.

So, stay tuned. I'll be posting more soon.
Comments:
Patrick,

The only 10mm figures I've painted are GW Warmaster Elves -- which come in strips like the Old Glory figs. I was surprised at how easy they were to paint.

I think that one of the keys for me was that I primed them with black, then dry-brushed them with white. Then I painted the major parts ("blocking in" so to speak) -- but not too carefully. With the black under-color any spots I failed to hit simply looked like shadows.

The important thing for me to keep in mind was that only things that could be seen from a yard away needed to be painted. Also, too many colors would "muddy" the look of the unit. And also, that since I was basing two strips one behind the other, that only half of any one strip would be all that visible (other than the head and shoulders -- so I needn't take too much time on every detail.

Anyway, I was very pleased with how they turned out. Now I'm interested to see how similar OR different your technique will be.


-- Jeff

http://saxe-bearstein.blogspot.com/
 
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